Blog

Welcome to the MOLA blog. Explore our latest news, discoveries, stories and content. Our blog posts are created by archaeologists and specialists from across the organisation and cover a range of fascinating and informative topics. Browse our posts using the tags, join in the discussion and share with your network.

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  • Archaeological investigation at Deptford Royal Dockyard

    Archaeological investigation at Deptford Royal Dockyard

    MOLA team
    16.12.2013

    The results of archaeological investigation by MOLA archaeologists at Deptford Royal Dockyard (known as Convoys Wharf) have been assessed and the post-excavation assessment report dated November 2013 has been approved by English Heritage and is now available to the public.

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  • Local school kids turn their hands to excavation in Camberwell Library, accomodated by Southwark Council.

    Placemaking & community engagement in 2013

    MOLA team
    11.12.2013

    At MOLA we recognise that the archaeology and built heritage of a development can be used to build a sense of place and shape its identity. Throughout the year we have worked with our clients on placemaking and community engagement, from community digs, public events and displays to interpretive hoardings, presentations to neighbours and blogs. Here are our 2013 highlights...

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  • Graffiti at Knole House, Kent

    2013 discovery highlights

    MOLA team
    10.12.2013

    2013 is almost over - where has the year gone?! The year may have flown by but we certainly have lots to show for it.

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  • WHSmith Art Deco tiles

    WHSmith Art Deco tiles

    MOLA team
    06.12.2013

    Building materials specialist, Ian Betts, and MOLA photographer, Andy Chopping, are working on a project to record and photograph surviving tile panels in branches of WHSmith.

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  • Roman eagle and serpent sculpture uncovered at Minories, London

    Pristine Roman sculpture discovered by MOLA

    MOLA team
    29.10.2013

    Archaeologists have discovered an extraordinary Roman sculpture in the form of an eagle firmly grasping a writhing serpent in its beak.

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