An abandoned vessel at Maldon's 'barge graveyard' (c) CITiZAN

CITiZAN star in new Channel 4 documentary

MOLA team
30.11.2016

This Saturday, 3rd December 2016, will see the final episode in this series of the brand new documentary ‘Britain at Low Tide’ air on Channel 4, featuring one of our flagship community archaeology projects, CITiZAN.

Significant archaeological sites along our formidable coastline are under threat from erosion by winds, waves and tidal scour. With every turning tide, the rich history of our island appears and disappears. ‘Britain at Low Tide’ sees palaeontologist Dr Tori Herridge and archaeologist Dr Alex Langlands follow the CITiZAN team, who are committed to recording disappearing coastal archaeology, to some of the most vulnerable and fascinating sites.

From fascinating prehistoric footprints in Formby to ancient submerged forests, several shipwrecks, a lost harbour and much more besides, the programme raises awareness of our threatened coastal heritage and highlights methods used to survey and monitor those features like creating 3d models  from aerial drone surveys, developing apps and capturing time-sensitive discoveries with video.

The programme also highlights the wonderful work that CITiZAN’s dedicated network of volunteers are doing. If you would like to find out more about becoming a volunteer, then click here

Catch up here and explore the locations featured in more detail via the CITiZAN website!

Episode 1:   Northumberland:  filmed  at Beadnell and Howick the programme explores the lost harbour at Beadnell, the wreck of the French ship Tadorne and CITiZAN volunteers’ work on the Howick bathing pools.

Episode 2:  Formby/Liverpool:  features the famous prehistoric footprints, the remains of England’s first lifeboat station and the wreck of  SS  Pegu, lost in 1939.

Episode 3:  Essex:  investigates a Tudor coastal fort, a foreshore fish trap and the abandoned Thames sailing barges at Maldon.

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