Finds tray (c) MOLA.png

Applications open for MOLA Collaborative Doctoral Partnership PhDs

MOLA team
06.03.2020

We are excited to announce that applications are now open for three opportunities to study for a fully funded PhD at a UK university (University of Sheffield, University of York or Canterbury Christ Church University), co-supervised by a member of our staff. These PhDs are being offered as part of the Arts and Humanities Research Council’s (AHRC) Collaborative Doctoral Partnership (CDP) award.

The opportunities are as follows:

 

An interdisciplinary exploration of the social impact of foetal and perinatal mortality during the industrialisation of England

Offered in partnership with the University of Sheffield, this PhD will evaluate the impact of industrialisation on responses to foetal and perinatal loss, illuminating the effect of urbanisation on the 18th-19th century English family. The project will collate a dataset integrating funerary and osteological evidence, combining evidence from MOLA excavations with University of Sheffield collections, extant reports, and data from new and ongoing excavations. Patterns in funerary practices will be identified, cross referencing burial data with evidence of life course parameters to illuminate the wider environment in which these young children briefly lived. Critical integration of archaeological data with historical evidence using theoretical understandings of the material body, funerary rites and emotions that facilitate a deep, interdisciplinary reading of the evidence will illuminate the nature and motivations of responses to infant loss, and wider relationships to life and death in an industrialising environment.

This project will be jointly supervised by Dr Lizzy Craig-Atkins (Archaeology, University of Sheffield) and Robert Hartle (MOLA), with support from Dr Chris Millard (History, University of Sheffield) and Diego Rodrigo-Maganto (MOLA). The student will be expected to spend time at both Sheffield and MOLA, as well as becoming part of the wider cohort of CDP funded students across the UK. 

For full details of the studentship, including further particulars and how to apply, please follow the link to the advert on the Sheffield website.

Informal enquiries relating to the project can be directed to Dr Lizzy Craig-Atkins.

Application deadline: 1st May 2020

 

Digital Recording, Fieldwork and Craft at Museum of London Archaeology

Offered in partnership with the University of York, this PhD will examine digital recording strategies in development-led archaeology. Fieldwork recording has developed from relatively rudimentary diaries/notes during antiquarian excavations to routinized pro forma, partly developed by MOLA in response to large, urban excavations. Digital systems have been embedded in post-excavation processes for many years, but field-based recording is still overwhelmingly performed using pen and paper or pencil and permatrace, with digital approaches a new introduction. While studies have considered utility in increased speed, fidelity and reflexivity, there has been little examination of impact on the commercial sector. This dissonance results in urgent pressures: uneven skills among archaeologists; recorded data that is not incorporated into interpretations; mismatch between traditional publication methods and digital recording; inaccessibility of archaeological interpretations to an interested public. This PhD will gain insight into this, and digital recording and knowledge production in archaeology generally, particularly in terms of the long tradition of archaeological craft at MOLA, how digital recording impacts archaeologists’ skills, non-alienation of archaeological labour, and the interpretation and dissemination of archaeological remains.

This project will be jointly supervised by Dr Colleen Morgan (University of York) and Louise Fowler (MOLA) with support from Steve Roskams (University of York) and Peter Rauxloh (MOLA). The student will be expected to spend time at both York and MOLA, as well as becoming part of the wider cohort of CDP funded students across the UK.

For full details of the studentship, including further particulars and how to apply, please follow the link to the advert on the York website.

Informal enquiries relating to the project can be directed to Dr Colleen Morgan.

Application deadline: 1st May 2020

 

Shifting sands: coastal Kentish heritage and communities in transition

Offered in partnership with Canterbury Christ Church University, this PhD will investigate the impact of archaeology/heritage and citizen science initiatives on individuals and local communities across Kent’s east coast, with the aim of maximising benefit and sustainability of future projects. Community initiatives delivered across East Kent are partly in response to research trends and funding priorities directed towards advancing understanding of the societal and economic benefits of archaeology and heritage. This region has a rich history, but its coastal towns suffer some of the highest levels of deprivation in South-East England. In this context, research into the impact of projects urgently needs undertaking. This PhD questions what the value is of these projects to coastal communities in transition, and how we ensure legacy. The research aims to examine impact of archaeology/heritage and citizen science initiatives on individuals, groups and communities within these coastal settlements, and how it varies depending on participants, stakeholders, type of initiative, and location, as well as to evaluate wider and longer-term impacts through development of an evaluation toolkit that is adaptable to localised contexts, helping inform strategies and best practice guidelines for maximising benefit, sustainability, and legacy of future projects.

This project will be jointly supervised by Dr Ellie Williams (CCCU) and Lara Band (MOLA) with support from Peter Vujakovic (CCCU) and Helen Johnston (MOLA). The student will be expected to spend time at both CCCU and MOLA, as well as becoming part of the wider cohort of CDP funded students across the UK.

For full details of the studentship, including further particulars and how to apply, please follow the link to the advert on the CCCU website

Informal enquiries relating to the project can be directed to Dr Ellie Williams

Application deadline: 15th April 2020

  • Research

Related blogs