Blog

Welcome to the MOLA blog. Explore our latest news, discoveries, stories and content. Our blog posts are created by archaeologists and specialists from across the organisation and cover a range of fascinating and informative topics. Browse our posts using the tags, join in the discussion and share with your network.

Pages

  • Rare Roman coin depicting ill-fated emperor Laelianus identified on A14C2H

    MOLA Headland team
    20.05.2019

    Our archaeologists have uncovered an incredibly rare coin featuring a Roman emperor who reigned for only two months during the post-excavation work on the A14 Cambridge to Huntingdon improvement scheme. In this blog, we explore the significance of this coin.

    Read more...

  • Park Street burial ground and Birmingham’s population expansion

    MOLA Headland team
    17.04.2019

    In 1780 historian William Hutton wrote ‘…instead of the church burying the dead, the dead would have in time buried the church…’. He was talking about the great numbers of people dying in Birmingham, resulting in the walls of St Martin-in-the-Bullring church nearing collapse as the number buried overwhelmed the churchyard. In this blog Mary Ruddy from WSP, Archaeological Consultant on HS2’s Park Street excavation, explores the effects that population growth in 19th century Birmingham had on the city and its inhabitants.

    Read more...

  • Ask the Expert: Iron Age coins in Cambridgeshire

    MOLA Headland team
    17.04.2019

    In this blog, find out from our in-house numismatist, Julian Bowsher, all about a beautiful Iron Age gold coin discovered on the A14 Cambridge to Huntingdon improvement scheme.

    Read more...

  • Evidence of cremation in the archaeological record

    MOLA Headland team
    11.04.2019

    In this blog, we look at cremation urns, what they are, and what they mean for archaeologists.

    Read more...

  • All Change Please! Exploring Birmingham’s minting history

    MOLA Headland team
    08.03.2019

    1797 was the year that the first top hat debuted on top of a haberdasher’s head; the year that poet William Wordsworth was suspected of being a French spy whilst the war with France raged on; the Bank of England issued the first one-pound and two-pound notes, and the year that Birmingham took another step forwards on its journey to industrial transformation, and secured its place in coin minting history.

    Read more...

Pages