Blog

Welcome to the MOLA blog. Explore our latest news, discoveries, stories and content. Our blog posts are created by archaeologists and specialists from across the organisation and cover a range of fascinating and informative topics. Browse our posts using the tags, join in the discussion and share with your network.

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  • Evidence of cremation in the archaeological record

    MOLA Headland team
    11.04.2019

    In this blog, we look at cremation urns, what they are, and what they mean for archaeologists.

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  • All Change Please! Exploring Birmingham’s minting history

    MOLA Headland team
    08.03.2019

    1797 was the year that the first top hat debuted on top of a haberdasher’s head; the year that poet William Wordsworth was suspected of being a French spy whilst the war with France raged on; the Bank of England issued the first one-pound and two-pound notes, and the year that Birmingham took another step forwards on its journey to industrial transformation, and secured its place in coin minting history.

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  • Ask the Expert: Senior Archaeologist

    MOLA Headland team
    06.03.2019

    This week, Emma Jeffery, Senior Archaeologist at MOLA Headland will be talking about the amazing archaeology of the A14 Cambridge to Huntingdon improvement scheme at Current Archaeology Live. In this blog, we find out more about her role on the Highways England scheme and what happens next.

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  • How are x-rays helping archaeologists identify finds from A14C2H?

    MOLA Headland team
    21.02.2019

    X-rays are a non-destructive way of exploring metal archaeological finds in more detail.

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  • Capt Matthew Flinders breast plate (c) HS2, courtesy of MOLA Headland CROP.jpg

    Why do archaeologists get excited by named burials?

    MOLA Headland team
    24.01.2019

    Archaeological excavation at St James’s burial ground in Euston for HS2 is underway and we are uncovering a large number of burials with surviving name plates. The opportunity to combine detailed osteological analysis with historical research is unprecedented.

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